Seek & Disco Seek A beauty. We are all love as loving
Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink (via fliponymous)

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

(via haveyouevercriedwolf)

White people are still the ~standard so that’s not so revolutionary.

(via dykeprivilege)

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

(via little-bulldozer)

If you take away anything from this website, please let it be what I bolded ^

(via buxombibliophile)

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via fuckyeahcracker)

See also: Why intersectionality is REALLY FUCKING IMPORTANT OK.

(via geekygothgirl)

(via afrometaphysics)

BREAKING: Recording captured shots fired at Michael Brown, lawyer says : News

youwish-youcould:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Six or seven shots. A three-second pause. Four more shots. 

An audio file obtained by the Post-Dispatch on Tuesday is believed to have captured the shooting of Michael Brown Jr.

If authenticated, it would be the first recording of the actual incident to have surfaced since Brown’s death on Aug. 9. 

Lawyer Lopa Blumenthal said her client, who lives in the apartment complex where Brown was killed, captured the shooting while recording a video text message to a friend.

Blumenthal said the man who made the recording did not want to be named. She said he came forward reluctantly and feared for his safety. 

The FBI interviewed him for about an hour and a half on Monday, she said. 

A private autopsy showed Brown was shot six times, but did not reveal the number of times Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson fired his weapon.

The shooting has sparked nightly demonstrations and attracted world wide media attention.

Blumenthal said sympathizers to both Brown and Wilson have contacted her saying that the three second pause bolsters their cases.  

But Blumenthal said she thought the recording was important. 

"There was a pause," she said,"and to me a pause means time to think and contemplate." 

Blumenthal would not reveal her client’s name or the exact location of his residence, except to say it was in the Canfield Green apartment complex in close proximity to the shooting.

Nor would she give out the name of the person who received the video. 

But she said she was certain the recording is authentic. 

"I’m 100 percent positive this is accurate," she said. "He is not doing this for the publicity. He has no motivation to lie." 

To listen to the audio recording [TW: GRAPHIC CONTENT], click here.

Source: Stephen Deere & David Hunn for The St. Louis Dispatch

Omg

(via thebluelip-blondie)

darvinasafo:

It’s slowly approaching….

darvinasafo:

It’s slowly approaching….

(via mydamnblogposts)

stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: #MikeBrown Funeral - August 2014 

  1. Mike Brown casket w/ St. Louis Cardinals baseball cap
  2. Brown’s mother Lesley McSpadden at her son’s service
  3. Attendees united in song
  4. Funeral attendees
  5. Memorial including long line of roses at Mike Brown’s murder site
  6. A painting & memorial from Atlanta, GA

(via feministfag)

kingjaffejoffer:

Michael Brown’s dad before the burial. 
The emotion and all of the sweat…. shit is hard to look at, even if its only a picture

kingjaffejoffer:

Michael Brown’s dad before the burial. 

The emotion and all of the sweat…. shit is hard to look at, even if its only a picture

(via pennilessambition)

kreyolcoco:

Look at the violence that we face when we refuse to stay silent about what happens to us Black folks.

Shit is disgusting and scary as fuck

jcoleknowsbest:

dagwolf:

jcoleknowsbest:

So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….


Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 





The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.






Guess what’s happened since Brenda spoke about this on her Facebook? From the Facebook user:

Brenda Sanders10 hours agoOPEN LETTER TO FACEBOOK:To all the hundreds of people who have sent me friend requests because of the post I made about the boy who got his by a car, I would like to apologize to any of you whom I have not responded to. I had absolutely no idea that my post would go viral. Honestly I was just venting to my FB friends about a horrible thing that I witnessed and couldn’t have imagined that it would pick up this kind of momentum. I responded to the first couple dozen friend requests and was absolutely amazed by the negative responses I was getting from people. So many people sent me friend requests so that they could have the opportunity to criticize my actions person-to-person. A lot of people seemed to have issues with the fact that I didn’t post pictures of the kid, that I didn’t stand up to the cops more, that I didn’t figure out a way to get the boy to tell me his information, even though he couldn’t talk at the time - at least one person even thought I should have lied and told the cops that I HAD witnessed the accident. Then there are the racists, neo-Nazis, and just plain ******* white people who have accused me of making the whole thing up to get attention, of trying to stir up controversy and other much more bizarre motives. I’ve been called a “race baiter” a “reverse racist” (whatever the hell that’s supposed to be) and other much more inflammatory things that I won’t mention here. I’ve even been threatened.I’m sure that many of you who have sent me friend requests are not like this. You’re probably good people who were understandably outraged by my story and just wanted to connect with me out of support and solidarity. Because of those initial negative experiences, though, I’ve decided to stop accepting friend requests at this time. I’m sorry, but if you’d seen some of the things people were saying I’m sure you would understand. I will take a moment to address some of the more frequently asked questions that people have had:#1 Why didn’t I post pictures of the boy on Facebook? First off, the entire incident caught me completely off guard. My main concern before the paramedics arrived was making sure that he was alright. I was down on the ground, holding his hand, telling him that everything would be okay — unlike the others around us who seemed much more concerned with making sure the girl who hit him with her car was okay. The one thing I was NOT doing, however, was standing over this young man taking pictures of him with my cell phone. Shame on anyone who thinks I should have been.#2 Why didn’t I stand up to the police more in the situation? I tried. But once they realized I wasn’t an actual witness to the accident they completely disregarded what I had to say. Could I have gotten in their faces about it? Um, has anybody been paying attention to what’s been going on in this country right now? Are you really suggesting that I should have taken an AGGRESSIVE STANCE against law enforcement officers right now? Do you value MY life at all??#3 Why didn’t I get the kid’s name, address, phone #, social security #, fingerprints, mother’s maiden name, emergency contact person, etc.? THE BOY WAS GASPING AND CRYING IN EXTREME PAIN FROM WHATEVER DAMAGE WAS DONE BY THE SPEEDING VEHICLE THAT SLAMMED INTO HIS BODY. Trust me on this, he was in no condition to tell me his life story.#4 Why didn’t I lie and tell the cops that I had witnessed the accident so that — what?? What the hell would that have solved? If I didn’t ACTUALLY see what happened and other people did, I think the cops would be able to figure out pretty quickly that I was lying. Soooo … I really don’t know what else to say about that one.I don’t know how to feel about the fact that this post went viral. On the one hand, it was a relief to share the experience and have so many people who I haven’t even met show their understanding of the absolute frustration that black people are dealing with everyday in this country. It was good to feel supported and, yeah, I guess I’ll go ahead and say it - to be validated. At the same time, I’m definitely concerned, especially with people TAGGING the Baltimore City police department in their shares, talking about getting guns and going out and killing people, and some of the other more violent things that folks are proposing be done about the current situation we find ourselves in. I would hate to think that my post would be the cause of somebody going out and doing something that they’ll regret.Thank you to everyone who reached out. Thank you for the kind words, thank you for caring about the well-being of that young man when no one else did, thank you for the prayers that were sent out to him. I hope that we can somehow use experiences like these as a catalyst for positive change and not just fuel to feed the fires of our collective rage. I don’t have the answers for how to bring ourselves out of this situation, but one thing that recent events have done is motivate me to get up and do SOMETHING. I sincerely hope that others will do the same.


This is what happens when we speak out….

jcoleknowsbest:

dagwolf:

jcoleknowsbest:

So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….

Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 

The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?

And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.

Guess what’s happened since Brenda spoke about this on her Facebook? From the Facebook user:

Brenda Sanders
10 hours ago
OPEN LETTER TO FACEBOOK:


To all the hundreds of people who have sent me friend requests because of the post I made about the boy who got his by a car, I would like to apologize to any of you whom I have not responded to. I had absolutely no idea that my post would go viral. Honestly I was just venting to my FB friends about a horrible thing that I witnessed and couldn’t have imagined that it would pick up this kind of momentum. 


I responded to the first couple dozen friend requests and was absolutely amazed by the negative responses I was getting from people. So many people sent me friend requests so that they could have the opportunity to criticize my actions person-to-person. A lot of people seemed to have issues with the fact that I didn’t post pictures of the kid, that I didn’t stand up to the cops more, that I didn’t figure out a way to get the boy to tell me his information, even though he couldn’t talk at the time - at least one person even thought I should have lied and told the cops that I HAD witnessed the accident. 


Then there are the racists, neo-Nazis, and just plain ******* white people who have accused me of making the whole thing up to get attention, of trying to stir up controversy and other much more bizarre motives. I’ve been called a “race baiter” a “reverse racist” (whatever the hell that’s supposed to be) and other much more inflammatory things that I won’t mention here. I’ve even been threatened.


I’m sure that many of you who have sent me friend requests are not like this. You’re probably good people who were understandably outraged by my story and just wanted to connect with me out of support and solidarity. Because of those initial negative experiences, though, I’ve decided to stop accepting friend requests at this time. I’m sorry, but if you’d seen some of the things people were saying I’m sure you would understand. I will take a moment to address some of the more frequently asked questions that people have had:


#1 Why didn’t I post pictures of the boy on Facebook? First off, the entire incident caught me completely off guard. My main concern before the paramedics arrived was making sure that he was alright. I was down on the ground, holding his hand, telling him that everything would be okay — unlike the others around us who seemed much more concerned with making sure the girl who hit him with her car was okay. The one thing I was NOT doing, however, was standing over this young man taking pictures of him with my cell phone. Shame on anyone who thinks I should have been.


#2 Why didn’t I stand up to the police more in the situation? I tried. But once they realized I wasn’t an actual witness to the accident they completely disregarded what I had to say. Could I have gotten in their faces about it? Um, has anybody been paying attention to what’s been going on in this country right now? Are you really suggesting that I should have taken an AGGRESSIVE STANCE against law enforcement officers right now? Do you value MY life at all??


#3 Why didn’t I get the kid’s name, address, phone #, social security #, fingerprints, mother’s maiden name, emergency contact person, etc.? THE BOY WAS GASPING AND CRYING IN EXTREME PAIN FROM WHATEVER DAMAGE WAS DONE BY THE SPEEDING VEHICLE THAT SLAMMED INTO HIS BODY. Trust me on this, he was in no condition to tell me his life story.


#4 Why didn’t I lie and tell the cops that I had witnessed the accident so that — what?? What the hell would that have solved? If I didn’t ACTUALLY see what happened and other people did, I think the cops would be able to figure out pretty quickly that I was lying. Soooo … I really don’t know what else to say about that one.


I don’t know how to feel about the fact that this post went viral. On the one hand, it was a relief to share the experience and have so many people who I haven’t even met show their understanding of the absolute frustration that black people are dealing with everyday in this country. It was good to feel supported and, yeah, I guess I’ll go ahead and say it - to be validated. At the same time, I’m definitely concerned, especially with people TAGGING the Baltimore City police department in their shares, talking about getting guns and going out and killing people, and some of the other more violent things that folks are proposing be done about the current situation we find ourselves in. I would hate to think that my post would be the cause of somebody going out and doing something that they’ll regret.


Thank you to everyone who reached out. Thank you for the kind words, thank you for caring about the well-being of that young man when no one else did, thank you for the prayers that were sent out to him. I hope that we can somehow use experiences like these as a catalyst for positive change and not just fuel to feed the fires of our collective rage. I don’t have the answers for how to bring ourselves out of this situation, but one thing that recent events have done is motivate me to get up and do SOMETHING. I sincerely hope that others will do the same.

This is what happens when we speak out….

(via depressednmoderatelywelldressed)

jcoleknowsbest:

So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….


Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 





The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.

jcoleknowsbest:

So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….

Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 

The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?

And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.

(via theillnana)

alwaysbewoke:

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.
One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.
However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.
All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:







Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:


I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

as someone who didn’t watch this video (because i would never watch anything taylor swift) i have to say this is the most learned break down of this video, the intent of the video and what’s actually happening in the video i’ve read. absolutely awesome.
i will also say that the initial reaction to the video is representative to two things. one is how untrusting black people are of white people in certain areas and when it comes to certain things because of years of abuse. our skepticism of them is actually a situation of their own creation given the many centuries black people were used as props in the theater of their lives. it’s not something that is over with, it’s still happening today. all you have to do is pay attention to what katy perry is doing and it becomes painfully clear. it’s an earned side-eye white people get from blacks when they see and/or hear certain things. a perfect example is the relationship between police and black community. if we got news today that another unarmed black person was killed by a white cop, overwhelmingly black people will assume that the white cop was completely and totally in the wrong until proven otherwise. why? history. nothing is done in a vacuum. everything that is said and done follows centuries of words and deeds. now maybe in that situation, video will show that the black kid was actually reaching for an uzi or something and if that’s the case black people will have NOTHING to apologize for because their skepticism is something white cops have earned. white people on the other hand have years upon years of pleasant experiences with the police and therefore or more prone to believe that it must have been something that the black person did wrong that caused the police to do what they did. generally speaking the police in their communities will speak pleasantly to them while the police talk to us like we’re animals. only when whites live in urban areas do they start to see the daily abuses blacks have to contend with in dealing with police and only then do they start to realize that for us it’s a completely different kind of experience from which we draw from in making our assumptions and conclusions. i think the same is what may be happening here with this video.the second thing is that twerking is not only a dance created by black people, it’s an explicitly sexual dance and make no apologies for being so. it’s also a dance that makes use of (and some might even say celebrate) black bodies because to be done right, it requires a body type that is more often than not found on black women. a body type that has been the target of ridicule and mockery for its “excesses.” in being that it’s far more culturally black than the other dances where blacks were featured. it is far more tightly associated with blackness than ballet for instance (even though misty copeland is fcking awesome). so when it is found to be in the hands of a white person, how it’s handled, in our eyes, become a clue into what your innermost thoughts are of us and, specific to this situation, black women. it’s the same way blacks gained clues into what a white person thought of black people by their opinions on rap music. therefore i think people fixated on that scene (or scenes) far more intensely than the other ones because those scenes are thought of being statements about black people and culture. as george lipsitz eloquently explained:

if white racism manifested itself exclusively through hostility and exclusion it would be easier to understand and to combat. yet the long history of interracial relations has also created a possessive investment in whiteness that entails embracing people of color and their cultures in condescending and controlling ways. the recurrence of racial stereotypes in art and in life, the frequent invocation of people of color as sources of inspiration or forgiveness for whites, and the white fascination with certain notions of “primitive” authenticity among communities of color, all testify to the white investment in images that whites themselves have created about people of color.

so i can understand how those scenes are, in the minds of black people, far more important in discerning taylor swift’s ideas about black people which ties back into my first point. if in examining this, black people come away unamused or even offended, the fault is not our own. white people have and continue to earn our mistrust.

alwaysbewoke:

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.

One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.

However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.

All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:

Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:

I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

as someone who didn’t watch this video (because i would never watch anything taylor swift) i have to say this is the most learned break down of this video, the intent of the video and what’s actually happening in the video i’ve read. absolutely awesome.

i will also say that the initial reaction to the video is representative to two things. one is how untrusting black people are of white people in certain areas and when it comes to certain things because of years of abuse. our skepticism of them is actually a situation of their own creation given the many centuries black people were used as props in the theater of their lives. it’s not something that is over with, it’s still happening today. all you have to do is pay attention to what katy perry is doing and it becomes painfully clear. it’s an earned side-eye white people get from blacks when they see and/or hear certain things. a perfect example is the relationship between police and black community. if we got news today that another unarmed black person was killed by a white cop, overwhelmingly black people will assume that the white cop was completely and totally in the wrong until proven otherwise. why? history. nothing is done in a vacuum. everything that is said and done follows centuries of words and deeds. now maybe in that situation, video will show that the black kid was actually reaching for an uzi or something and if that’s the case black people will have NOTHING to apologize for because their skepticism is something white cops have earned. white people on the other hand have years upon years of pleasant experiences with the police and therefore or more prone to believe that it must have been something that the black person did wrong that caused the police to do what they did. generally speaking the police in their communities will speak pleasantly to them while the police talk to us like we’re animals. only when whites live in urban areas do they start to see the daily abuses blacks have to contend with in dealing with police and only then do they start to realize that for us it’s a completely different kind of experience from which we draw from in making our assumptions and conclusions. i think the same is what may be happening here with this video.

the second thing is that twerking is not only a dance created by black people, it’s an explicitly sexual dance and make no apologies for being so. it’s also a dance that makes use of (and some might even say celebrate) black bodies because to be done right, it requires a body type that is more often than not found on black women. a body type that has been the target of ridicule and mockery for its “excesses.” in being that it’s far more culturally black than the other dances where blacks were featured. it is far more tightly associated with blackness than ballet for instance (even though misty copeland is fcking awesome). so when it is found to be in the hands of a white person, how it’s handled, in our eyes, become a clue into what your innermost thoughts are of us and, specific to this situation, black women. it’s the same way blacks gained clues into what a white person thought of black people by their opinions on rap music. therefore i think people fixated on that scene (or scenes) far more intensely than the other ones because those scenes are thought of being statements about black people and culture. as george lipsitz eloquently explained:

if white racism manifested itself exclusively through hostility and exclusion it would be easier to understand and to combat. yet the long history of interracial relations has also created a possessive investment in whiteness that entails embracing people of color and their cultures in condescending and controlling ways. the recurrence of racial stereotypes in art and in life, the frequent invocation of people of color as sources of inspiration or forgiveness for whites, and the white fascination with certain notions of “primitive” authenticity among communities of color, all testify to the white investment in images that whites themselves have created about people of color.

so i can understand how those scenes are, in the minds of black people, far more important in discerning taylor swift’s ideas about black people which ties back into my first point. if in examining this, black people come away unamused or even offended, the fault is not our own. white people have and continue to earn our mistrust.

(via theillnana)

// Of those humans that refuse to understand//

I see you. I have tolerated you. I cannot and will not continue to support your livelihood. For my own sense of health and happiness, you will no longer receive my love or my good graces.

Tear Gas Is an Abortifacient. Why Won’t the Anti-Abortion Movement Oppose It?

mangoestho:

A couple of years ago, when I was newly pregnant and reporting in the West Bank, some of my local colleagues insisted that I skip covering a protest at an Israeli checkpoint. At first, I was resistant to letting pregnancy stand in the way of my work, but they knew from experience that there might be tear gas, and tear gas, they said, causes miscarriages.

They were right: though rigorous studies are few, there is evidence that tear gas is an abortifacient. In 2011, Chile temporarily suspended its use after a University of Chile studylinked it to miscarriage and fetal harm. Investigating the use of tear gas in Bahrain in 2012, Physicians for Human Rights found that local doctors were reporting increased numbers of miscarriages in exposed areas. And UN officials have connected tear gas to miscarriages in the Palestinian territories.

This means it’s likely that police in Ferguson, Missouri, have been spraying abortion-causing chemicals on crowds of civilians. Recently at TheNation.com, Dani McClain wrote about the killing of black youth as a reproductive justice issue, one that goes to the heart of the rights of parents to raise their children in peace, safety and dignity. She’s correct, of course, but if the anti-abortion movement were actually concerned about the well-being of the unborn, then the violence in Ferguson would be a pro-life issue as well.

(Source: aloofshahbanou, via diplomaat)

http://atane.tumblr.com/post/95283252444/i-have-had-friends-bear-witness-to-white-people

atane:

keeskie:

atane:

"I have had friends bear witness to white people at a rally for Mike Brown in LA this past Sunday co-opt and erase antiblackness and lead chants of “We are all Mike Brown” when they will never be Mike Brown." via owning-my-truth

That is how white supremacy works. The misdirection…

Wait im trying to understand this post. Are we criticising our allies for using the same chants we are using at rallies, protests, etc?

Hello,

I don’t know what you don’t understand. I think my post was pretty clear. Nevertheless, I’ll attempt to make it clearer for you and the people telling me they are confused and don’t understand.

1. White people who center themselves in discourses and protests against anti-Blackness or when Black people are murdered are not allies. It’s not about them. I’m not fond of the term ally, but being an ally means offering support and solidarity. It doesn’t mean becoming the people you are supporting and standing in solidarity with.

2. The first thing a white ally should do is decenter themselves and decenter whiteness. You don’t do that by claiming to be just like a Black murder victim. Only Black people are like Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin. Black people are the ones who are the victims of anti-Black extrajudicial killings.

3. A true white ally would understand why they are not Mike Brown or Trayvon Martin. Extrajudicial murder for whiteness does not happen at the hands of the police and vigilantes. Certainly not at the level of extrajudicial murder for Blackness at the hands of the police and vigilantes.

4. When Black people are murdered by the police and vigilantes, we always witness the collusion of white supremacy by the police and the media who work hard to smear the Black murder victim in death. This doesn’t happen to white murder victims. It doesn’t even happen to white murderers. The humanity of Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin is neither respected nor acknowledged because those dedicated to anti-Blackness work hard to justify the slaying of Black people. Reasons for why they were gunned down will be trotted out. “He wore a hoodie!” “He stole cigars!” “He smoked marijuana!”. There is always a reason.

Meanwhile, actual white mass murderers and terrorists like Anders Breivek, James Holmes, Adam Lanza, Jared Loughner and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will still be afforded their humanity. These are mass murderers and terrorists, but their whiteness affords them humanity. The humanity of scourges of the earth and white dregs of society like Breivek, Holmes, Lanza, Loughner, Tsarnaev etc will always be acknowledged despite their heinous crimes, while the murders of Black victims will always be justified. Hell, Tsarnaev was presented to the nation as a sexy dreamboat, complete with a Rolling Stone magazine cover, like he was the 6th member of One Direction. Tsarnaev is a murderer and a terrorist. This murderer and terrorist got more favorable press than a Black teenager executed in broad daylight whose corpse was left lying on the street in the hot summer sun for hours, before an unmarked vehicle took his body away. Not even an ambulance. If Black people don’t protest, there would be no investigation for these murders. From Renisha McBride to Amadou Diallo to Trayvon Martin to Jordan Davis to Aiyana Jones to Ousmane Zongo and the long list of unarmed Black people murdered. Black people have to protest and take to the streets for justice, or for even an arrest or charges to be brought up. Who else has to beg for justice? White people certainly do not have to do this. This is why white people are not Mike Brown. This is why white people are not Eric Garner. White investment bankers aren’t getting choked to death on the sidewalk by the cops. In the event that it should ever happen, their killers would not remain free and uncharged, even after the medical examiner rules their death a homicide.

5. White people are not and will never be victims of anti-Blackness. White people chanting that they are Trayvon Martin is absurd. Trayvon was deemed suspicious, followed, confronted and ultimately murdered because he was a Black kid. White kids aren’t followed, confronted and murdered for walking home while white, after buying skittles and iced-tea. A white person saying that they too are Trayvon is not how you show support. That is how you erase the reason why he was murdered.

I cannot get any clearer than this. If you still don’t understand, then I can’t help you.

micdotcom:

5 disturbing facts about police militarization in America

Those cops in riot armor beating and tear-gassing protesters in Ferguson didn’t drop out of thin air. As American police continue to receive billions in military-grade equipment free or subsidized by the Pentagon and Homeland Security, they’ve predictably started to act more like a military force in hostile territory than the public’s protectors.

Facts from ACLU report show just how big the problem has become Follow micdotcom

(via abagond)

The Ferguson Police Department STILL has not released a police report from the shooting of Michael Brown. They did release a FULL police report AND video AND stills from what they ADMIT is an unrelated incident in which the shooting victim, Michael Brown, THEY say, was implicated in a theft at a convenience store earlier in the day on the day police killed him. They released ALL of that, but NO police report, still to this day, from the shooting of Michael Brown. They still have also not released the autopsy results from the county autopsy of Michael Brown. Today, the Ferguson Police Department turned down a request from NBC News to please see the personnel file of the officer who’s been named as the shooter of Michael Brown. The ONLY thing they would release is his name, the day he was hired, and his salary. They would not release any other details from his police file. The one substantive piece of information that the Ferguson Police Department DID decide to release about the officer implicated in the shooting, the ONE piece of information they HAVE decided to release, was THIS video that they released today, showing the officer in question receiving a COMMENDATION from the City Council for good police work.
Rachel Maddow. Thursday, Aug. 21st. (via iwriteaboutfeminism)

(via sheilastansbury)

{!} different than one might expect. Meet me to greet me.